Ultimate Raspberry Pi Configuration Guide

Ultimate Raspberry Pi Configuration Guide

The Raspberry Pi is a great thing: it is real computer, it is cheap ($40), it can interface with electronics, talk to the web and has full HDMI support.However it runs on Linux, which I have a love hate relationship with. I lovethe idea of Linux, but when I start messing around the command line and downloading packages and installing things, I often get lost.I’ve assembled bits and pieces from various online posts and guides into this Instructable, which is what I call the “Ultimate Raspberry Pi Configuration Guide”.What this Instructable does is to set up a wireless Raspberry Pi that allows you to: ssh into from the Terminal window on the Mac (or equivalent on another machine). run wirelessly with a static IP for each SD card. automatically startup, no log in set your the time zone skip the GUI of the Raspberry Pi, which bogs things down and is unnecessary for most tasks minimize any external monitor use, specifically never having to lug a monitor over to where the ethernet router lives clone a “basic settings”SD card so that we can have as many base level installations as we want.Right now, I have 3 Raspberry Pis running in my closet, each with a different purpose: one runs 7 Twitterbots, one is a Git server and one is an experimentation device for electronics. I plan to add more.I wrote this Instructable for someone who has a secure home newtwork. You should have a router that can accept a direct ethernet cable. Get a 2A one if at all possible An 4gb SD card. For most cases, there isn’t a need for anything larger. A USB wifi dongle. It doesn’t matter what the name of the card is.What does matter is that the format is MS DOS (FAT). Format the SD card. It will only take a few seconds.For those of you unfamiliar with using this app, Terminal provides a command line for controlling the underlying Unix operating system on Max OS X.Type in (then press enter):This will list all your mounted drives. You will see something like the image above: a list of drives with different partitions on them. You want to find the information pertaining to your newly formatted SD card. In my case it is /dev/disk1s1. This may be different on your computer.
Ultimate Raspberry Pi Configuration Guide